Howards’ Way – Series Four, Episode Twelve

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There’s a few strangers round Tarrant way this week. First to pop up is Roy Johnson (Pip Miller), an old buddy of Ken’s. Although perhaps “buddy” is stretching it a bit far (the fact that the soundtrack is set to ominous and threatening makes this rather obvious). Johnson has an absent brother (if you think of the Piranha brothers then you won’t be too far off the mark) although it’s the present Roy who helps to shine more light on Ken’s dodgy earlier life.

A more convivial and real buddy is Scott Benson (Paul Maxwell) who gives Jack the surprise of his life. They were old war comrades back in Korea and Scott explains to a slightly rapt Abby and Leo just how much of a hero Jack Rolfe was back then. Scott’s story seems to be such a cliché (Jack saved his life under heavy enemy fire) that it’s slightly hard to take seriously, but it is presented dead straight.

Jack Rolfe as a military hero, complete with medals, takes a little processing – although Scott, still mourning the recent death of his wife, hasn’t returned to publicise his old friend’s former gung-ho ways. Instead, his presence adds to the general reflective nature of the episode, as many of the regular characters – not just Jack – seem to be at something of a crossroads in their lives.

Leo is bluntness personified with Abby, telling her that any court would probably decide that William would be better off with his American family.  After all, what can a penniless Abby offer in return?  Leo seems rather to be ignoring the wealth and influence of both Charles and Sir Edward, but maybe he was deliberately being harsh in order to try and snap Abby back to reality.  Telling that that he’s prepared to walk away from her might be part of the same plan …..

Now that the story about Sir John Stevens’ financial mismanagement has been made public, he needs friends.  He’ll always be able to rely on good old Sir Edward won’t he?  Nigel Davenport flashes a wide crocodile grin that should give you the first inkling that poor Sir John’s going to be thrown to the wolves.  They might be old, old friends, but there’s clearly no room for sentiment in business.  This may appear to be the end of Sir John’s story, but not so – he remains a regular in the series right up until the end, although – as with many characters – his allegiances shift over time.

Avril – disgusted at the way Charles fires Sarah – is still considering a take-over of Relton.  Remember when Charles didn’t want any truck with business, instead he was content to potter around the art galleries, operating as a bountiful benefactor?  That all seems an awfully long time ago, as we see him and Avril enter yet another round of sniping and name-calling.  There still something of a spark between them (Charles optimistically considers that they have a relationship still worth saving) but maybe it’s just the last flickering embers ….

Sir Edward’s latest cosy chat with Jan is one of his most fascinating.  We learn for the first time that (contrary to the picture painted by his PR people) his family haven’t owned Highfield for generations, instead his grandfather sold coal from a market barrow.  That Sir Edward had such a combative relationship with his father seems, possibly unconsciously, to have affected the way he’s always treated his son.  Even though Sir Edward can still recall the only time his father struck him, no lesson seems to have been learned from this moment.  Instead, he was as equally distant to Charles when he was growing up, resulting in their current, frozen, relationship.

Rather uncharacteristically, Gerald indulges in a spot of insider-trader to make a tidy profit.  The way he explains this to Polly (in a slightly shamefacedly way) does rather make the point that – despite his protestations – he knows he’s been a little naughty.  An odd thing for Gerald to have done, as he’s always seemed to be above that sort of thing (so either we don’t know him as well as we think we do, or the scriptwriters have suddenly decide to spice him up a little).

Tom and Jack start the episode all smiles.  Tom finally tells Jack that he thinks his Orkadian design is first-rate – which pleases Jack no end (Tom might not be a designer of wooden boats, but his opinion is still worth something).  The long-term HW watcher will probably be asking themselves exactly what Jack will do to break this fragile entente cordiale.  Why, he offers the American rights of the Orkadian to Scott of course, managing the neat trick of irritating both Tom and Avril at the same time.  I love Jack.

How many times has Jan refused to marry Sir Edward?  I almost wish now I’d kept a tally as I worked my way through these episodes, but this most recent one (“I am not for sale”) must surely be her last word on the matter.  Mind you, I did think that last time.

Ken and Avril form a potentially unholy alliance. All business of course, but the possibility that they might start a relationship is so mind-bogglingly bizarre that I’d love to see it. They’re hanging out in what I’ve now decided must be Tarrant’s only restaurant, and when Ken spies Sir Edward and Jan close by (of course, remember what I said about the lack of eating facilities elsewhere) he tells Avril that his own designs on Jan are all in the past. So was the end of the previous episode just a false cliffhanger or is Ken lying again? Time will tell.

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Howards’ Way – Series Four, Episode Eleven

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The Barracuda pulls into harbour and Robert Hudson (Bruce Boa) emerges.  Abby’s father-in-law, he instantly casts an imposing presence (we’d previously seen him back in series two and he hasn’t changed since then).  He’s a genial chap on the surface, but it’s plain that underneath there’s an even more ruthless and implacable type than Sir Edward or Charles put together.  And this is the man who Abby hopes will meekly hand William back to her?  The omens don’t look good ….

Hudson’s come complete with a small entourage – a female secretary whom he quickly dispatches to London and a male assistant who seems to be multi-skilled (does one of his attributes include functioning as a bodyguard?).  Sir Edward is on hand to welcome him and for the moment it’s all smiles.

Later, the pair have a horseback chat.  I have to say that Bruce Boa doesn’t look terribly comfortable in the saddle – he rather wobbles around from side to side, even though the horse is barely clip-clopping along.  Nigel Davenport, by contrast, looks much more secure.

The soundtrack for this episode is a little different from the norm – with no sailing scenes to speak of, the usual score – honking saxophones – isn’t called for.  Instead (and reflecting the tone of this instalment) there’s a subdued, twanging guitar feel – which compliments the anxious feeling generated by Hudson’s presence.

A good example of the thorough way Hudson operates is demonstrated when a photographer (hiding in the bushes) snaps Abby and Leo, mid-embrace.  Previously we’ve seen how Leo was offended by Sir Edward’s suggestion that he should steer clear of Abby (at least until the question of William’s custody has been decided) but moments like this make it plain that he knew what he was talking about.

The meal between Hudson, Sir Edward, Jan and Abby is as monumentally awkward and awful as you might expect.  Abby’s gone to some trouble – cooking Hudson’s favourite food, doing her hair, popping on a nice dress – but none of that is going to cut any ice with him.  And when Abby impatiently wonders why they’re sitting around chit-chatting, rather than discussing William, the fragile peace shatters.

Hudson’s not interested in negotiation and decides that Abby – especially now he has evidence of her canoodling with Leo – doesn’t have a legal leg to stand on.  And what does Sir Edward do?  Not a lot really.  It’s strange to see him so impotent and unable to respond, but as he later admits to Jan, there was nothing he could do.  Both he and Charles had independently attempted to find some chink in Hudson’s armour – a way (via business) to bring him to heel, but there was nothing doing.

And so it’s goodbye to Bruce Boa again (until the twelfth episode of series six). Hudson’s appearance here may be brief, but the discord he sows lingers for some time.

Elsewhere in Tarrant, the question of Sarah Foster’s position at Relton is causing friction between Charles and Avril.  First their personal relationship ruptured, now it looks as if their business relationship might go the same way.  Charles wants Sarah fired, Avril doesn’t.  If Charles pushes, then Avril threatens to resign – although she won’t stop there.  She’s mulling over the possibility of launching a bid to take over Relton herself.

She discusses this with Jack over dinner (where else? At our favourite restaurant of course).  Now that I’ve started to notice how often the great and good of Tarrant use the same very small restaurant each episode, I can’t un-notice it.  Michael and Sarah were in there earlier on, although at least they did sit by the teeny-tiny bar (which isn’t seen too often).

Jack continues to be on fine form.  There’s a lovely scene in the Jolly Sailor where – yet again – he’s extoling the virtues of orange juice.  Kate eyes him suspiciously,  meaning that you can possibly guess the punchline.  She takes a sip and it turns out to be practically neat vodka!  This is just one of a number of occasions when Jack’s called upon to give us a hangdog look.

The dinner-party from hell seems to signify the end of the teetering relationship between Jan and Sir Edward.  She returns his gift – the flashy sports car – and sets off on the long walk home.  But then Ken happens to drive by and she gladly accepts a lift.  Even though she knows that Ken can’t be trusted an inch, there’s a little frisson between them.  Could they hook up again?  Surely Jan wouldn’t be that stupid.

The day after the night before, Abby ends up on the dockside, rather the worse for wear.  She’s tired and emotional, telling Leo that the chances of her regaining William seem remote.  Wailing that she hasn’t got a friend in the world, it’s the cue for the ever-loyal Leo to her that she’s got at least one ….

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Howards’ Way – Series Four, Episode Ten

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Ace journalist Michael Hanley, now working for Ken at Leisure Cruise, is beavering away on his latest scoop – an expose of Sir John Stevens.   This is another example of Ken’s deviousness – having had his business ventures scuppered once too often by Sir John, he’s now out for revenge.  But rather than do it himself, he’s decided to get Michael to do his dirty work for him.

Michael’s an up-to-date sort of guy, as he’s typing his words of wisdom on a word processor.  The camera briefly lingers on the screen (allowing us to see that he can’t spell whizz kid ….).

This is another example of a HW plot oddity.  If the scandal they’ve unearthed, from 1963, has been buried so deeply, how exactly has Ken been able to piece it together?  Or if the information has been available in the public domain for some time, why has nobody else broken the story?

Another plot weakness occurs after Tom learns that their proposed new yard has already been sold (Sir Edward gazumping his son).  Emma believes this may be a blessing in disguise – since being tied too closely to Charles might inhibit them.  She suggests they buy a new yard with their own money (possibly asking Jack to join them).

But Charles – via Relton Marine – has been involved closely in the day-to-day financial operation of the Mermaid Yard for several years, so it’s not clear exactly why working at a new yard, backed by Charles’ money, would be any different from their current situation.  Remember that the Mermaid was dependent on Relton manufacturing the Barracuda, etc.  Without their support surely the Mermaid would have gone to the wall year ago?

But whilst Tom, Emma and even Jack (who now sees the logic of a second yard) are considering their future, there’s a diversion to enjoy.  Jack’s organised a marine treasure hunt – although he’s a little upset that some (Leo & Abby, Michael & Sarah) aren’t taking it terribly seriously.  Mmm, that’s another thing – at the end of the previous episode Michael and Sarah were established as a couple, but unless I’ve forgotten it, I don’t remember this ever being a plotline previously.  Oh, and Sarah looks really rather lovely when she and Michael are out and about on the treasure hunt.

Sir Edward and Jan have lunch (that restaurant set is getting used an awful lot this year).  He wants Jan to join him and Abby when Hudson Snr comes calling from America.  His reason?  Hudson might be more inclined to let William go if he knew that Abby’s family was extensive – i.e. Jan making an appearance as the Lady Frere to be.  Yes, this seems like just another bare-faced attempt by Sir Edward to force Jan into accepting his marriage proposal, but even he – after she refuses – seems finally to realise that she’s slipping away from him.

They’re all very mature types down Tarrant way.  Later, Jan returns to the restaurant for a drink and a meal with Emma.  Tom is naturally enough the topic of their conversation, with Emma firmly of the opinion that Jan remains the most important woman in his life.  Jan modestly demurs, telling Emma that she’s exactly the sort of person Tom needed years ago – somebody who shares his interest in boats (it was established right from the first episode, this has never been Jan’s forte).  It’s hard to imagine Jan and Avril having such a convivial chat a few years back (or indeed Tom and Ken – the mind positively boggles on that ever happening.  Pity, as it would have been entertaining).

Jan and Polly continue to enjoy an icy relationship.  Jan’s still smarting over the fact that her exclusive haute couture range has been sullied with cheap, mail-order stuff (it’s selling very well and therefore making a tidy profit, but that seems to be by the by).  Poor Polly keeps attempting to build bridges, but Jan’s content to keep twisting the knife – although she eventually proposes a solution.  Polly buys the franchise from Periplus and she can therefore go into business herself (it also means that Jan’ll be shot of Polly, so everyone’s a winner).

This is a great episode for Ken, with two scenes standing out especially.  The first occurs after he disturbs a late night intruder at Leisure Cruise – it’s Sarah, come to find the file about Sir John that Michael’s been working on.  Although she too has an interest in ruining Sir John (it would help to solidify her position at Relton) she has scruples – unlike Ken – so isn’t here for that reason.  She’s more interested in protecting him (and Michael’s reputation too).

Ken’s in full alpha-male mood – grabbing her roughly (by the throat at one point) and generally being incredibly unpleasant.  These are the moments when the real Ken Masters surfaces.

He may be smartly suited the next day, when he and Sir John meet for lunch (yes, once again we’re back in the same restaurant – one day I’m going to add up exactly how many times it featured this year) but scratch under the surface and nasty old Ken’s still there.  Sir John is his usual affable self and is little more than mildly amused at Ken’s attempt to blackmail him (Willoughby Gray plays the scene excellently).

If Ken was expecting his dinner guest to be cowed into submission then he’s disappointed – Sir John tells him to “publish and be dammed” leaving Ken with much to ponder (and a decent end of episode close-up for Stephen Yardley).

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Howards’ Way – Series Four, Episode Nine

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Jack’s still hopping about on the quayside (“somebody’s nicked my bloody boat”) although it quickly becomes clear that it hasn’t been stolen – Emma, smarting after her tiff with Tom, has taken it out for a test run.

But since she should have been back by now, Tom’s worried that she’s run into trouble. So it’s Jack and Tom to the rescue, with Jack piloting a motorised dingy at high speed. Glyn Owen was clearly a decent sailor, since he – rather than a stuntman – was at the wheel. Oh, and I like Jack’s white bobble hat too.

It doesn’t take long before they find her – repairing a minor fault – so everyone can breathe a sigh of relief.  Tom is the most relieved and he admits this to Emma.  This moment of crisis helps him to finally admit his feelings for her, although he goes on to explain his commitment issues (he’s got twenty years of marriage and two children to consider).   But this didn’t seem to be an issue when he had an affair with Avril, so I’m not entirely sure that his protestations hold water.

Poly’s continuing to avoid Jan.  Jan is getting very, very annoyed with her (former?) friend’s shenanigans.  Tip-tapping on her high heels, Jan is clearly out for vengeance whilst Polly seeks solace with Ken, of all people.  I love the fact that Polly refers to Jan as a snob! (this is Polly we’re talking about, remember).  Although to be fair to Polly for just one second, there may be some truth in her suggestion that Jan’s not keen on her range of German leisurewear solely because it’s a tad downmarket.

Ken’s very devious in this episode.  In fact, he’s so devious and calculating that it seems rather out of character – usually Ken’s not as subtle as this.  He tells Polly that Sarah is secretly working for Sir John, knowing that she will tell Gerald who in turn will tell Charles.  Both Gerald and Charles (although not Avril, interestingly) then believe that Sarah could be a spy, although there’s one fatal flaw conerning these machinations.  Gerald knew full well that this information came from Ken, so why would he believe it?  That two such astute businessman as Charles and Gerald would be prepared to believe this unsubstantiated rumour seems a little hard to believe.

Sir Edward and Jan are currently estranged (he’s even stopped leaving messages on her answering machine) but he’s keeping it in the family by entertaining Kate to dinner. No, he hasn’t decided to move up the family tree with someone more his own age – he wants to sound Kate out to see if she knows whether Jan will change her mind about marrying him.  Kate, of course, isn’t backwards about speaking her mind and so is bluntness personified (naturally, her opinions aren’t really what Sir Edward wants to hear).

Michael comes in second in the transatlantic race – a good result, although Tom – ever the perfectionist – was a little ticked off he didn’t win.   Michael quickly returns home (by plane) and, with Tom’s agreement, allows a chap called Hudson to sail the Barracuda back to the UK.  Hang on, Hudson?  It would be a remarkable coincidence if this was a member of Abby’s estranged American family ….

As for Abby herself, it’s the day of her exhibition but she’s not looking forward to it.  On the one hand, she wants to make a career out of photography (therefore it’s important that she demonstrates what she’s capable of) but on the other, too many negative vibes are swishing around her head.  As always, it’s sensible Leo who’s on hand to offer her support and gently guide her through the minefield.  With his assistance she’s able to mix and mingle with the great and good of Tarrant society (she was all set to slip out quietly and go straight home).

But for long-term Leo/Abby watchers, it’s the aftermath which is the key moment.  Everybody else has left, leaving them alone in the gallery.  She tells him that “all that matters to me is that the three of us are going to be together. You and me and William”.  She may be jumping the gun a little here since William’s future hasn’t been decided.  It’s also a little unexpected (given their recent fractured relationship) that she’s decided that the pair of them have a future – which they seal with a long and very loving kiss …..

Since everybody who’s anybody in Tarrant is at the gallery, there’s a few awkward meetings.  Leo and Ken bump into each other (and then quickly move away) but even better is the encounter between Sir Edward and Charles.  It’s the first time that they’ve been in the same room since Sir Edward visited his son in hospital and it’s plain that their relationship is still on the critical list.  They do have a brief conversation, although Charles pointedly turns his back on his father and instead speaks to the other side of the room.

Tom breaks the news to Jack that he’s thinking of leaving the Mermaid for larger premises.  He wants Jack to come with him, but it’s hardly going to come as a surprise to learn that Jack isn’t interested – the Mermaid is in his lifeblood.  Surprisingly, Jack doesn’t erupt with fury when Tom tells him, instead he’s quite sanguine about it all.  These scenes have some lovely Tom/Jack byplay – Maurice Colbourne and Glyn Owen both seemingly relishing the material they’ve been given.

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Howard’s Way – Series Four, Episode Seven

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This episode pretty much picks up where the previous one finished, so we see Barracuda pulling into port with an ambulance crew waiting for Jack. Although the incidental music is still set on “sinister and anxious” at least he’s awake and is his usual cantankerous self (which is a good sign). “Where are you guys taking me? I’m not going to St Hilda’s. I had a wisdom tooth out there”.  Three guesses which hospital he ends up at …

I like the way that Tom later insists that Leo should stay with Jack at the hospital (Tom never seems to stop and consider that maybe he should stay). Leo is slightly whiny (“why me?”) but you know that since he’s such a good natured-soul he’ll be happy to do so. And so he does.

The way that the episode deals with Avril’s reaction to the news is very interesting. Tom calls her (she’s at Jan’s house – helping to investigate the saga of the stolen designs) and when she takes the receiver we see her face suddenly fall. But then we cut to Tom (“oh, no, no, Avril, it’s all right”) and we don’t cut back to Avril again.

What’s very notable is that after this moment Avril doesn’t mention her father for the remainder of the episode. All of her scenes are business related – jousting with Charles and Gerald, wining and dining new recruit Sarah – meaning that her father seems to be low on her list of priorities. Harsh? Maybe, but whilst we’re told that she does visit Jack in hospital, we don’t actually see it (whereas we are witness to Kate’s visit – where she dishes out a typical dollop of good old-fashioned common sense, much to Jack’s disgust!)

This foregrounding of Avril-as-businesswoman may have been intentional or it could just be the way the scripting turned out – but it does seem odd that we never learn what she thinks about her father’s hospitalisation (even Polly – hardly Jack’s biggest fan – is given a moment to react with dismay at the news).

Jack, you’ll be glad to hear, isn’t too bad at all. He does have an ulcer, but as long as he lays off the booze, cigars and adopts a healthy diet then all will be well. Yes, I can see three things wrong with that picture too.

Dr Bishop (Alexandra Mathie) is something of a tarter, but the fact she’s a woman (something which Jack can’t help but blurt out) seems to stun him the most. Has he not visited many hospitals recently? When she quizzes him about his habits, can you guess what he says when she asks him about drink?

“Oh that’s very kind of you, I’ll have a small scotch please”.

Predictable, yes. But it still raised a smile.

I can’t help but be intrigued by the fact that Alexandra Mathie’s fairly limited cv includes the film Paper Mask (set in a hospital) and television series such as Doctors, Casualty and Coronation Street (where she played a doctor). Was it just coincidence that she seemed to so often play roles which were medically based?

Abby and Polly are continuing to get on well, something which is slightly surprising (I’d have thought by now they’d have regressed to their usual habits). The question of William does slightly divide them, but once again Polly’s attempting to help, as seen when she later visits Charles and asks if he can intercede. This he’s disinclined to do – whatever else he thinks of his father, he knows that he’s more than capable of wresting William away from the Hudsons.  Although he does admit that if and when William does arrive in the UK it will then be advisable to prise him out of Sir Edward’s clutches. Abby clearly doesn’t seem to have appreciated that Sir Edward may have an agenda for his grandson which is different from hers.

Things are not going well for Ken. He asks Sir John if the bank will front for him on Guernsey since he can’t apply for trading status directly. As he bitterly admits, he doesn’t wear the old school tie (an ironic comment, especially as he wasn’t allowed into Sir John’s club straightaway since he wasn’t wearing a tie). Ken’s status as an outsider – barely tolerated but never accepted by those he wishes to emulate – is never clearer than in this episode.

There are some fine cardigans on display in this episode. One is worn by John Reddings (Stephen Grief). Yay, Travis Mk1! He may lack the eyepatch, artificial hand and psychopathic tendencies of Travis, but Reddings is still dangerous in his own way.

Ken employs him to recover Jan’s stolen templates and we learn here that it was Ken who paid for them to be pinched in the first place. The rotter. But he’d intended that the designs would be destroyed, not taken to Taiwan and copied, which suggests that Ken wanted to ruin Jan a little, but not too much.  That sort of makes sense I guess (since he wanted to buy back into her company).

Reddings does the job, but at a price. He has a tape-recording of Ken’s admission he organised the theft and is unabashed at requesting hush money. A pity that Reddings doesn’t reappear, since an actor as good as Stephen Greif shouldn’t be wasted with just a handful of scenes.

Here’s something I never thought I’d see – Tom and Charles all pally. They too are sporting nice cardigans as they head off to Charles’ tennis court for a quick game. Charles is still attempting to woo Tom to accept the design job so it’s not entirely a pleasure trip, but the fact that Tom accepted shows that he’s mellowed (or that despite himself he’s interested in the offer). We only see the first point of the game – Charles thunders an ace past Tom – but it may serve not only as an indication of who won, but also Charles’ desire to win everything at any cost.

We don’t see much of Sir Edward. Apart from leaving yet another plaintive message on Jan’s answering machine, he doesn’t pop up until the last ten minutes or so. Am I the only one to find his constant endearments (“hello, my love”) slightly intimidating? The man’s not taking Jan’s “no I won’t marry you” as an answer, so has bought her a flashy sports car as a blatant bribe. Jan initially pulls a face (she’s standing by the sink, filling the kettle whilst he’s waggling the car keys behind her back!) but we don’t see her categorically refuse the present ….

Michael sets off in the Barracuda – one of a score of boats making a solo transatlantic crossing.

Sarah breaks the news to Ken that she’s leaving to take a plumb job at Relton. He doesn’t take it well. “That bitch doesn’t let the grass grow under her feet, does she?” he mutters, referring to Avril. And he doesn’t seem to rate Sarah herself any higher. “What the hell does Charles Frere want with deadwood like you?”

He then roughly prevents her from slapping him (holding firmly onto her arm) but although he’s physically stronger, it’s Sarah who seems to have won the business battle. He does tell her not to come crawling back to him for a job when Relton have no further use for her, but this just seems to be a case of Ken trying to keep his own spirits up. This year hasn’t been a good one for Ken, will his luck change anytime soon?

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Howards’ Way – Series Four, Episode Six

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Jan’s business woes move up a notch as she discovers that all her major suppliers now regard her to be a bad credit risk.  She spies the evil hand of John Soames at work – miffed that she wouldn’t share his big bed – but is disinclined to ask Sir Edward for help.  So Jan faces having empty shops with nothing to sell unless she can find a solution ….

Meanwhile, interest in the marina at L’Ancesse over on Gurnsey is hotting up.  Ken is keen to buy it as it’ll provide him with a nice little tax haven and so has persuaded Sarah to put a bid in (Ken’s, ahem, colourful past means that he has to stay in the shadows).  But Charles wants it too as Sir John explains to Sir Edward.  “Well, she wants it because Masters wants it. Masters wants it because Charles wants it. And god alone knows why Charles wants it”.

Charles’ reasons quickly becomes clear.  The America’s Cup, he says, is not the showpiece event it once was (thanks to the way that the Americans have excluded many top performers) so he plans to establish his own world class race – to rival, or even surpass it.  And where better to start the race from than the picturesque L’Ancresse?

Charles wants to assemble a team to build a world class boat too, which means he needs the very best designer – so naturally he approaches Tom.  Mmm, I know what you’re probably thinking – since Charles could pick just about any designer in the world, why would he choose Tom?  Lest we forget, they’re not exactly the closest of friends.  In story terms it makes perfect sense, but in the real world it’s slightly harder to swallow.  But as I’ve said before, there’s no point in equating HW with real life.

And as it happens, Tom’s at a loose end as he’s just angrily resigned from Sir Edward’s America’s Cup team.  The final straw came when Tom received a package which was full of photographs of their rival’s boats.  Sir Edward sees nothing wrong in this – all’s fair in business – but Tom, always a moral man, won’t have any truck with stealing.  So in a rather good little scene, Tom and Sir Edward face off.  Tom’s implacable whilst Sir Edward, radiating menace, murmurs that not many people cross him.  Watch this space, as I daresay Sir Edward has a long memory.

It’s a remarkable coincidence that Charles happens to ask Tom (via Emma – Charles isn’t foolish enough to approach Tom direct) to be a part of his team on the very day that he walks out on Sir Edward …..

Tom’s yet to agree, but another personnel movement seems much more likely.  Avril offers Sarah a job – helming Relton Power.  This serves several purposes – as Sarah’s already been negotiating for the L’Ancresse site, having her at Relton would strengthen Charles’ bid, and as a bonus it’ll tick Ken off.  And Ken’s been in a filthy temper today, shouting at Sarah and generally treating her like dirt.  So she’s more than keen to jump ship, question is will Leo join her?

Jack’s still in a good mood, although he’s been getting a few twinges which are worrying him.  With a sense of the dramatic, he tells Kate that he’s not long for this world, although Kate – sensible as ever – takes no nonsense from him, telling him to see a doctor and pull himself together.  It doesn’t seem to be too serious, but as we’ll see things take a dramatic turn later.

But before that happens there’s one of my favourite Jack scenes from all of the six series.  Jan, desperate for clothes to sell, elects to send Kate out to buy up stock from other shops.  She persuades Jack to help her and this leads to the wonderful sight of a bashful Jack – arms full of ladies clothes – desperately attempting to reach the car before anybody spots him.

Unsurprisingly he doesn’t make it as Bill happens to ride past on his bike (Tarrant’s a very small place) and despite Jack’s best attempts to hide, the terrible truth about Jack Rolfe and women’s clothing comes to light!  Glorious stuff.

Abby and Leo continue to have a distant relationship.  Although they agree to call a truce, they’re finding it increasingly difficult these days to connect in the same way that they used to.  Possibly this is because Leo now has his own interests and responsibilities and is no longer able (or willing?) to always be on call.  This is demonstrated when he’s unable to stay in and watch a video of William (Sarah’s invited him to dinner).

It’s difficult to blame him – Sarah’s one of his bosses after all – but it leaves an emotionally fragile Abby alone with only her memories of her son.  Luckily, Kate later pops up to hear Abby’s story and wipe away her tears.

Tom and Jan have another meal.  As Leo tells Sarah (they’re sitting a stone’s throw away in the same restaurant – remember, Tarrant’s a very small place) it’s slightly strange to see – they couldn’t live together and now they can’t seem to live apart.  Sarah drops her bombshell about leaving, forcing Leo to contemplate his own future.

Another series, another top fashion designer.  In this episode Jan confirms what the audience had probably already suspected – Anna won’t be returning.  So Jan needs another young, gifted (and cheap!) world class designer to fall in her lap.  Does Julian Fitzsimons (Jamie Roberts) fit the bill?  The fact that he only appears in this episode suggests that from now on Jan’s designers may be talked about, but they’ll rarely be seen.

If Jan’s business finally seems to be picking up (Sir Edward, much to Jan’s irritation, deals with her credit problem), then her personal life is still somewhat messy.  She finally plucks up the courage to tell Sir Edward that she can’t marry him.  He’s quite calm about this – mainly because he’s confident that over time he’ll be able to change her mind.  Sir Edward is not a man who takes no for an answer (a cliché I know, but it’s absolutely true).

The episode concludes in a highly dramatic fashion as Jack suffers an attack whilst he, Tom, Leo, Abby and Michael are out on the water.  Heart attack?  Testament to Glyn Owen’s quality as an actor, but seeing Jack – someone we’ve grown to love – in such distress is uncomfortable.  No doubt he’ll bounce back, but it’s a very unsettling scene.

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Howards’ Way – Series Four, Episode Five

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Whatever happened to all the environmentalists down Tarrant way?  A few years back the proposed Marina development had them out in droves, but Ken’s new plan to turn a bird sanctuary into an oil field doesn’t attract even a murmur of protest.

Not even Leo, once upon a time the Earth’s friend, seems bothered.  Although it may be that he doesn’t know that Ken has earmarked the sanctuary (and presumably most of the birds) for destruction, even though he is aware that Ken’s interested in oil.

Another episode, another argument between Leo and Abby.  This one takes place at Leisure Cruise and only the sudden arrival of Ken puts an end to hostilities.  I do like the way that Ken mutters “don’t mind me” and then daintily walks past them.  A little bit of Stephen Yardley business maybe?

Ken’s feeling very pleased with himself.  If Gerald and Sir Edward decide to join him in his oil venture then he’s convinced they’ll all make a great deal of money.  And even though he’s yet to get their signatures on the dotted line, he’s already eyeing up ways to spend his new fortune.  Do you get an inkling that this is all going to come crashing down very soon?

Avril and Gerald are also having a humdinger of an argument, although this is business, not personal.  The arrival of Charles, in a natty blue suit, gives them pause – although both are a little disappointed that he’s not returned to take over the reigns.  But Charles does say he will be back “sometime” which is something of a change from the previous episodes, where he seemed to have retired for good.  A slight inconsistency in the scripting or is it more that we should never believe everything Charles says?  Like his father, Charles Frere can be a devious man.

Jack’s in a jolly mood today.  A very jolly mood.  Singing Yellow Submarine, he’s a little ray of sunshine (something which isn’t appreciated by everybody – especially Emma).  Sir Edward pops by the Mermaid and although he’s disappointed that Tom isn’t there, decides not to waste his time and asks Jack to dinner at Highfield.  Bill may not have any lines during this unexpected invitation, but Robert Vahey steals the scene anyway – mainly due to the way his eyes dart from Jack to Sir Edward and then back again.  Those eyes speak a thousand words.

By rights Jack should be a little down in the dumps, since Gerald has rejected his new boat proposal.  But he’s not at all downhearted and decides to raise the money via a three horse accumulator.  Kate, of course, is the racing expert, so he heads off to the boutique to seek her advice.  Jack/Kate scenes are always a joy and this one is no exception – plus we have the added bonus of Polly in the middle (who clearly regards Jack as the lowest form of life imaginable).  When he ever-so-politely asks Polly if he can use their phone, she tells him that no, he can’t.  “This is a boutique, Mr Rolfe. It is not the tap room of a pub, or the billiard hall”.

Jan’s in Italy (although the production clearly never left the UK).  Quick stock shots of the colosseum and a policeman do their best to create a continental atmosphere.  Jan’s popped over to speak to Anna and we later learn that they had a good conflab, although we never actually see her (she’s not a character who returned this year).

Jan then encounters John Soames (David Saville), an English accountant working for a top Italian fashion house.  He’s smooth (very, very smooth) and Jan is happy to accept his invitation to lunch.  Soames quizzes her about her marital status – Jan tells him that she’s divorced and admits that it’s something she regrets (was this the first gentle step to paving the way for an eventual Jan/Tom reconciliation?).  It’s telling that she doesn’t mention Sir Edward …..

Everything’s going swimmingly until Soames casually tells her that he’s got a company flat with a very large bed.  Would she like to stay over for a couple of days?  Uh oh.  She tells him not to be so silly and in an instant he switches from convivial to menacing, muttering that he’s going to ruin her company (given the already perilous state it’s in, he may not have to bother).  A little hard to believe that Jan, already with more than her share of bad luck, would instantly make such an implacable enemy, but this is Howards’ Way, not real life.

Sir Edward’s rather jealous when Jan, back in Blighty, tells him about Soames although their argument (today’s episode is a very combative one) is cut short when Tom arrives.  It’s all a bit awkward, Tom walking in on a tiff between his ex-wife and her (possible) new beau, but Tom’s more concerned with Sir Edward’s autocratic handling of the America’s Cup team.  Earlier he told Emma that Sir Edward was “a madman” and this meeting doesn’t do anything to ally his fears.  Tom wants to pick the people he works with, but Sir Edward isn’t having it.  Not at all.  Something’s got to give here.

Avril seems quite recovered after her funny turns last time, but now that her memory has returned in full she tells Charles she can’t marry him after all.  Like everything else these days, he takes it well.  Will nothing shake him out of his torpor?  Ah, maybe ….

And it’s all quite clever.  Sir John (on Sir Edward’s urging) lets Charles know that Gerald is considering a joint venture between Frere Holdings, Sir Edward’s company and Ken Masters.  What does Charles think of this?  “Ken Masters and my father? It’s a perfect description of hell on earth”. So this serves as the trigger to bring Charles back to his senses.  Gerald’s gratefully back to being a dutiful second in command, whilst Charles regains the hotseat.

What’s clever about this is that Sir Edward had no interest in Ken’s plan, but he knew exactly how Charles would react once he learnt that a joint venture was in the offing.  So it was Sir Edward who was able to manipulate Charles back into business (something which he’s blissfully unaware of at present).

This leaves Ken holding the baby.  With the clock ticking, he’s sitting in the bank waiting for his partners to show up.  They don’t of course, and since he can’t afford to seal the deal by himself, it’s all off.  Poor Ken – used and then tossed aside by Sir Edward.  For a brief few minutes he had the taste of the high life (expensive yachts, bikini-clad totty) but now he’s been brought back to earth with a bump.

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